GHS Labels: An Overview

The Globally Harmonized System is a universally agreed upon standard for the classification and labeling of chemicals. It has been fully adopted by OSHA, making it the agency’s Hazard Communication Standard since 2015. When the United Nations developed GHS, they developed a labeling system that had consistent elements and a defined format. There are many

A Guide to Facility Spill Kits

Spills are a presumed occurrence in most workplaces, but that doesn’t make them any less dangerous. Industrial spills create slipping hazards and depending on the substance, may pose a serious risk to human or environmental health. Prevention is the most effective solution for avoiding spills, but you should always be prepared for an emergency. You

Creating an OSHA-Compliant Sign System

Visual communication is critical for a safe workplace. When implementing a safety sign program or updating your current system, you will need to follow OSHA standards and know what your facility needs. A new visual system may seem daunting, but you can get started today! Assess Your Space To start implementing or updating a signage

GHS Safety Data Sheets (SDS)

Previously called MSDS (material safety data sheets) under the old OSHA HazCom Standard, safety Data Sheets are a critical part of GHS and are designed to communicate complete information about a chemical or mixture and how to mitigate any issues with handling or storage. Before GHS, the requirements for MSDSs were confusing and not very

Hearing Protection

How much noise or sound can your ears take? The sense of hearing and the organ in itself can only take so much. Occupational deafness has become common in many industries in recent decades because of the lack of measures to protect the ears. Like other senses, hearing has limitations that must be acknowledged by

Prevent Carbon Monoxide Poisoning This Winter

Carbon monoxide poisoning occurs most frequently between November and February in the United States, largely because of the use of heating systems in homes and other buildings. It’s worth assessing the carbon monoxide control methods used in your workplace this time of year to make sure you’re doing all you can to prevent the deadly

Hot Work Safety Near Storage Containers

According to the U.S. Chemical Safety Board (CSB), hot work accidents are among the most frequently reported accidents to that agency. Between 1990 and 2010, fires and explosions near flammable storage tanks caused by hot work accounted for more than 60 fatalities. Unfortunately, these accidents continue to take place. This past July, an explosion occurred during

Hard Hat Selection & Maintenance

Workers in many professions must wear hard hats on the job. Construction workers, electricians, firefighters, welders and many others use this personal protective equipment (PPE) to protect their heads from falling or flying objects and from electrical hazards. OSHA requires that employers provide their employees with head protection when the following hazards exist: The potential for

How to Use a Personal Fall Arrest System

Fall protection violations are the most common citation issued by OSHA, and understandably so; in construction, falls account for the most worker fatalities annually. In 2012, 279 construction workers died as the result of falls. Employers are responsible for implementing a satisfactory fall protection program at any workplace where employees work at heights of six

Respiratory Protection – Understanding OSHA Standard 1910.134

Employers must provide workers with proper personal protective equipment (PPE), according to OSHA Standard 1910.132. Some types of PPE like hardhats or steel-toed boots are less complicated than others like respirators, though. Respiratory protection is a class of PPE that contains many varieties of equipment, and OSHA has dedicated a separate section of its code—1910.134—to